Which Hygeia Breast Pump is Right for YOU?

One of the great things about Hygeia is that their fantastic professional-grade breast pump comes in 2 different versions. It’s nice to have choices. But choices can sometimes be confusing—especially when you are a sleep-deprived mother of a new baby.

The nice folks at Hygeia could have made it a lot easier on all of us by coming up with names that made sense. EPS? LBI? What the heck do those mean exactly? I finally have it all figured out and it’s really very simple once you understand that those abbreviations really mean very little. Just trust me as I describe each pump in detail. Continue reading

Hygeia Breast Pumps: Why I Made the Switch

A Hygeia representative visited me in my home one evening a few years ago. He enthusiastically told me about the history of Hygeia, the virtue of their breast pumps and why my clients would love them. I listened, skeptical as always, and gladly accepted some products to try out with the help of my clients. Continue reading

Sharing Breast Pumps: Is it Safe?

Smart moms shop around and look for bargains. And when we’re talking about items for the nursery and other new baby gear, hand-me-downs are often as good as new and can save you a lot of money. When it comes to purchasing a breast pump, however, think twice about buying used or sharing with a friend.

The FDA defines breast pumps as single-use devices —not designed for sharing. Most professional-grade pumps are “open systems.” This means that there is no barrier between the milk collection kit and the pump motor. (Rental pumps are “closed systems” and designed for multiple users.) If a mother has used the pump when she has had cracked or bleeding nipples, or mastitis, it is possible that blood or bacteria may have entered the motor. According to the FDA, …”a breast pump should only be used by one woman because there is no way to guarantee the pump can be cleaned and disinfected between uses by different women.”   Continue reading

Are Used Breastpumps a Bargain?

I have noticed more of my clients are buying used breastpumps or borrowing pumps from friends or family. As the prices of high-quality breastpumps increase, resourceful moms try to find less expensive alternatives to new pumps that can cost as much as 400 dollars.  Before you acquire a used pump, please consider the following.

Three hundred dollars is a lot of money, but it’s a drop in the bucket compared to the cost of formula.   Estimates range from $1000 to $4000 per year!

Breastfeeding moms who are separated from their babies for work or school depend on their pumps every day.  Pumps do have warranties, typically lasting from 90 days to 1 year, but they usually are not transferable.  So if you have a used pump, you have no warranty. In addition you have no idea how long a used pump will function.  When it fails, you will need to buy or rent another pump. Continue reading