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Sharing Breast Pumps: Is it Safe?

Smart moms shop around and look for bargains. And when we’re talking about items for the nursery and other new baby gear, hand-me-downs are often as good as new and can save you a lot of money. When it comes to purchasing a breast pump, however, think twice about buying used or sharing with a friend.

The FDA defines breast pumps as single-use devices —not designed for sharing. Most professional-grade pumps are “open systems.” This means that there is no barrier between the milk collection kit and the pump motor. (Rental pumps are “closed systems” and designed for multiple users.) If a mother has used the pump when she has had cracked or bleeding nipples, or mastitis, it is possible that blood or bacteria may have entered the motor. According to the FDA, …”a breast pump should only be used by one woman because there is no way to guarantee the pump can be cleaned and disinfected between uses by different women.”   Continue reading

Using Stored Breast Milk

photoThe milk that we buy at the grocery store has been pasteurized and homogenized. The pasteurization process kills all the bacteria and live cells in the milk—making it safe for us to drink, but also less stable. Homogenizing the milk blends in the fat so that it doesn’t separate and float to the top. Most of us don’t have experience using fresh milk straight from the source. Fresh milk from any mammal—including humans—looks very different from the milk we buy at the store.

After your milk has been expressed and it has been sitting on the counter or in the refrigerator for a while, the fat will begin to separate. You may notice a thin layer of cream on top of milk that looks quite watery. That is perfectly normal. Your milk has not gone “bad.” Continue reading