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Is My Baby Getting Enough Milk?

 

This 6-day old baby just had plenty to eat!

Wouldn’t it be nice if your breasts were equipped with little gauges that indicated how much milk was removed when your baby ate? Fortunately there are other ways to measure milk intake when a baby is breastfeeding.

Your baby should eat at least 8 times every 24 hours. If your baby is eating and not just sucking, you will be able to observe swallows. Swallows will be infrequent immediately after birth, but will gradually increase to about 1 swallow per second around day 4 or 5. Continue reading

Breastfeeding Myth: Colostrum

I hear this almost every day: My baby had to have formula in the hospital because I didn’t have any milk. Or, My baby wanted to breastfeed constantly so the nurse gave him formula.

Way too many healthy newborns are given formula in the first 48 hours after birth. New moms are often told that their baby is “starving” because they “don’t have milk yet.” Unfortunately, frequent feedings are seen as a sign of inadequate milk production instead of a sign of a healthy baby who is learning to breastfeed. Continue reading

Breastfeeding Myth: Sore Nipples

Myth: It’s normal to have sore, cracked nipples the first few weeks of breastfeeding.

One of the most common reasons women give for not initiating breastfeeding is “I’m afraid that it will hurt.” Breastfeeding is not supposed to hurt! Ever! Think of all the mammals who nurse their babies. Are they grimacing? Are they trying to avoid breastfeeding because of pain? Absolutely not. They look peaceful and relaxed. We are mammals too! Breastfeeding is a normal process that is meant to be enjoyable for mother and baby.

So, what are normal sensations when breastfeeding? Continue reading

Breastfeeding and Milk Supply

Why do some mothers seem to be overflowing with milk and others barely keep up with their babies? The answer to that questions remains a mystery. We do know, however, which practices enhance milk production and what may decrease milk supply.

Newborns need to eat frequently. All that early suckling before your milk “comes in” helps set the tone for later milk production. Think of as your baby placing an order to be filled at a later date. On the other hand, restricting breastfeeding in the first few days may lead to decreased milk production overall. Continue reading

Can I Increase my Milk Supply?

Do you feel that you are breastfeeding  “all the time”? Does it seem that your baby is never really satisfied at the breast? Is your baby wakeful? Fussy? Sometimes, despite doing all the “right” things, you may find yourself producing less milk than your baby needs. Here are some things you can try:

  • First, check with your lactation consultant or pediatrician to get an accurate weight for your baby. Then you will know if your baby needs some extra nutrition while you are working on your supply. Continue reading